Nov 2015 Bucharest mini-symposium reflections

PART 1 – About the Workshops

In November 2015, the researchers in the Creative Arts and Translating Cultures (CATC) and Researching Multilingually and Translating Cultures (RMTC) hubs visited the two Case Study 3 (CS3) researchers in Bucharest for a ‘mini-symposium’. Held in the offices of the Romanian Association for the Promotion of Health (ARPS), this two-day event strengthened the collaboration between the hubs and the case study (which focuses on researching and working multilingually at the borders of the European Union) and gave everyone the opportunity to meet again, exchange ideas and discuss issues that arise when working and researching multilingually. The reflections were further nourished by the presentations of Luciana Lazarescu, researcher at the ARPS, on immigration in Romania and of Jing Hiah, PhD student at the Erasmus University Rotterdam, on her research on Chinese migrants in Romania and in the Netherlands.

When preparing the symposium, the CS3 researchers thought of organising an associated event bringing together members of the research team and participants involved in the case study, with a view to ‘giving something back’ to groups and individuals in Bucharest who had generously given their time, help and expertise to the CS3 researchers. The idea then was to follow the example of the Language Fest that took place in November 2014 which brought together 40 college students in the Centre for Contemporary Arts in inner-city Glasgow to celebrate the diversity of languages present in the city and explore what speaking and learning multiple languages means to people in their personal lives. Once again, the aim would be to celebrate the diversity of languages present in the city of Bucharest and explore how people from different backgrounds learn, speak and use different languages in order to communicate with each other in their everyday lives.

Julien contacted colleagues at Conect (formerly known as ADO SAH ROM) to see whether a ‘workshop’ could be organised with this NGO whose aim is, among other things, to help migrants integrate in Romanian society. Julien had started collaborating with Connect in the summer and Rodica Novac, the Director of Conect, immediately gave a positive and enthusiastic answer. Julien and Rodica met a few times to discuss organisational aspects of the workshop and they organised a Skype meeting with members of the research team based in Bulgaria and the United Kingdom at the end of October 2015 in order to plan the event further. It was agreed that the event would take the form of four workshops: Drama, Poetry, Music and Crafting.

Blog Bucharest Part 1 image 1

The challenges and questions were numerous: Who was going to come? What would the participants’ expectations be? How to make sure that everyone would feel welcome? How to overcome different barriers, such as language barriers when the organisers of the different workshops did not speak Romanian or other languages of the participants and when the participants might not speak English?

The event took place on 5 November 2015 in the evening and was attended by around 40 participants. In the Drama Workshop, Katja and Jane facilitated a range of simple drama exercises as a way to celebrate and reflect on the languages and experiences that everyone carries with them. In the Poetry Workshop, Tawona and Mariam led the participants through a range of creative writing exercises with the aim of bringing out their own poetic voices.  In the Music Workshop, Gameli and Richard invited participants to translate their languages and lives into sounds and rhythms. In the Crafting Workshop, Cecilia and Prue led participants to print Ghanaian Adrinka symbols and explore how these relate to their life experiences.

Bucharest Part 1 image 2At the end of the workshops, a buffet dinner was served and everyone gathered in the main room and showed to others what they had done in their workshops. Participants were invited to write reflections about their experience on tags that they were given at the beginning of the workshops and invited to attach to a string suspended across the room at the end.

The encouraging and enthusiastic comments that they wrote on those tags and the warm atmosphere during the dinner showed that the evening was a rich experience for all.

After the event, all colleagues were invited to reflect on the workshop they had organised and over the next few weeks we will present their reflections on the blog.

Julien and Robert would like to thank particularly Luciana, Andra and Stefan at the ARPS for the kind help and support with the organisation of the mini-symposium and Rodica and Simina at Conect for their commitment and enthusiasm for organising the workshops (and for the pictures), it is thanks to them that the mini-symposium and the workshops were such a success.

Read part 2 here

Read part 3 here

Read part 4 here

Posted in Case Study 3, CATC, Events, RMTC | Tagged , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Researching Multilingually: Possibilities and Complexities Postgraduate Workshop

Friday 12 February 2016, 10.00 – 16.00
Institute of Modern Languages Research, University of London, Malet Street, WC1E 7HU

FREE EVENT

  • Am I allowed to include scholarly literature in Turkish?
  • What if I conduct my interviews in Mandarin but have to write all my thesis in English?
  • If I include data in Hindi, how will this affect my word count? How will the thesis be examined?
  • Do I transcribe then translate or the other way round?

If you are thinking about such questions, then this workshop is for you!

At this one-day event, we will draw on the experiences and reflections of researchers involved with our AHRC-funded projects: http://researchingmultilingually.com/ and http://researching-multilingually-at-borders.com to explore the possibilities for and complexities of what we term ‘researching multilingually’, i.e, how researchers draw on their own linguistic resources, and those of others, when undertaking research involving more than one language.

We will be inviting you to explore and apply these insights to your own research projects. Our aim is to support your developing researcher awareness with regard to your practices when researching multilingually. In this way, with you, we will be working towards a more clearly articulated ‘researching multilingually’ methodology.

The overall objectives of the workshop are to:

  • introduce you to the possibilities for and complexities of researching multilingually;
  • invite you to consider ethical and other issues where research involving more than one language is concerned;
  • support you as you develop your confidence and competence when researching multilingually;
  • offer you the space to reflect on your own ‘researching multilingually’ practice

You will also be encouraged to engage with our online Researcher Network, which continues to inform our understanding of ‘researching multilingually’ researcher practice.

Register for this FREE event here: http://bit.ly/1T3fkpq

Details about the organiser: Translating Cultures (AHRC)
‘Translating Cultures’ is one of the AHRC’s highlight themes which provide a funding focus for emerging areas of interest to arts and humanities researchers. The research projects undertaken within Translating Cultures address the need for understanding and communication within, between, and across diverse cultures by studying the role of translation, in its broadest sense, in the transmission, interpretation, transformation, and sharing of languages, values, beliefs, histories, and narratives.

Posted in Events, Reflections | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Special Issues Call for Papers

Special issue of Critical Multilingualism Studies
“The Critical Translation of Disciplines”

Multilingual practice and interdisciplinary inquiry share a complex difficulty in common. Since the 18th century, disciplines and (mono)languages have been structured in such a way as to control, police, and controversialize the actual crossing of their borders, while romanticizing the image of the frontier adventurer. Both languages and disciplines institute this dynamic through discourses of rectitude, expertise, and competence on the one hand, and through ascriptions of dilettantism, incomprehensibility, and irrelevance on the other. To cite Paul Kei Matsuda (2014), the recent “lure” of translingual writing—as well as the lure of transdisciplinary work—celebrates border-crossing in a way that tends to minimize or invisibilize the constraints that languages and disciplines demand from their practitioners as the entry tariff for participation. These disciplinary as well as monolingual constraints marshal access and resources through social, cultural, institutional, epistemic, and procedural means. Ignoring them yields acute and immediate disadvantage, until such time as a given practitioner achieves consecrated membership in a certain polyglot elite.

This special issue of Critical Multilingualism Studies explores the promising yet adverse practical territory called interdisciplinarity, and its potential value in understanding linguistic border-crossing, translanguaging, code-meshing, and other manifestations of multilingualism. Our goal is to take disciplines’ constitutive demands on their practitioners seriously, while understanding—through case studies in particular acts of critical interdisciplinary translation— how border-crossings in language, critical vocabulary, method, category of analysis, and means of inquiry can be conceived, planned, and undertaken. In parallel, we ask: to what extent can critique, advocacy, analysis, and justice be pursued multilingually, rather than solely by way of discrete monolingualisms?

The Journal of Critical Multilingualism Studies (CMS) is a peer-reviewed, transdisciplinary journal of scholarship on multilingualism, monolingualism, and their related social, cultural, historical, and literary/medial phenomena.

Contributions of 5000-8000 in any language and from any discipline or combination of disciplines welcome. Chicago citation style recommended, multimedia components encouraged.
Statements of interest, Jan. 15, 2016
Working drafts, Mar. 1, 2016

Download: CFP – Critical Translation of Disciplines

For questions, please contact CMS Editors, Prof. Chantelle Warner or Prof. David
Gramling at cms-journal@email.arizona.edu

______________________________________________________________

Special issue of Critical Multilingualism Studies
(cms.arizona.edu)
Languages under Pressure and Pain

The most frequent opening prelude to discussions of multilingualism is a specification of the current age of globalization—and the traffics of resources, financial and human capital, and even meanings that define it. Less emphasized are the human bodies who move, relocate, or even stay put amid the particular pressures they experience as they navigate the emerging linguistic, symbolic, and affective landscapes that social phenomena of mass global migration and dissemination leave in their wake. Within the lives of people who move physically and virtually through these spaces, languages and acts of languaging play a variety of sometimes intersecting, sometimes clashing roles– as modes of therapy and negotiation, as gateways to citizenship and employment, as familial gifts and acts of friendship, as response cries and as silent absences in the throes of pain, as symbols of hegemony and hope.

This special issue of Critical Multilingualism Studies considers languages and multilingual subjects in contexts in which they are put under pressure and pain. Possible questions include but are not limited to the following:

  • How can we describe and analyze the multilingual flow of mass migration on various social levels? How do people move between and through languages in the complex encounters of globalism today or in other historical moments?
  • What frameworks are available for articulating the lived languaging experiences of refugees, migrants, and asylum seekers as the resettle and in what ways do contemporary circumstances push pack on existing frameworks?
  • In what ways do institutional, national and international language policies address or obscure experiences of pressure and pain?
  • Can we posit an ethics of multilingualism or monolingualism in various contexts? What role does ethics play in decisions around language use and learning?
  • What are the affective dimensions of doing multilingual research? How can we engage critically with linguistic shame in scholarly work?
  • What alternate metaphors does scholarly work on multilingualism attuned to pressure and pain offer to fields such as second language and teaching, which have historically been dominated by resource metaphors including lack and acquisition?

The Journal of Critical Multilingualism Studies (CMS) is a peer-reviewed, transdisciplinary journal of scholarship on multilingualism, monolingualism, and their related social, cultural, historical, and literary/medial phenomena.

Contributions of 5000-8000 in any language and from any discipline or combination of disciplines welcome.  To be considered for this volume, submissions should be received by May 1, 2015, through the CMS website cms.arizona.edu. Chicago citation style recommended, multimedia components encouraged.

Download: CFP – Languages under Pressure and Pain

For questions, please contact CMS Editors, Prof. Chantelle Warner or Prof. David Gramling at cms-journal@email.arizona.edu

Posted in Call, Reflections | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Reminder – Deadline Monday 30 November: Call for Papers “Language Learning and Ethnographic Fieldwork”

University of Glasgow, Scotland
11-12 April 2016

Logo banner

For many researchers, learning a new language or working in a second or additional language is a crucial aspect of carrying out ethnographic fieldwork. Language learning and ‘competence’ affect all aspects of our lives ‘in the field’, as well as the analysis and ‘writing up’ of the fieldwork data, but we often do not document these influences in detail in our fieldnotes or include an analysis of their effects in our published work. Whilst we might have completed some language learning prior to fieldwork, the likelihood is that we were not taught in doctoral or other forms of research training how to reflect on the process of language learning or on issues relate to working in one or more other languages. These matters are also rarely addressed in the scholarly literature on ethnographic research. Similarly, the scholarly literature on ethnographic research contains very few detailed accounts of language learning or reflections on issues relating to ‘competence’ in a second or additional language.

This two-day workshop aims to provide an opportunity for researchers at all career stages to discuss a wide range of issues relating to language learning and ethnographic fieldwork. We welcome submissions on any aspect of the topic, but we would be particularly interested in papers addressing one or more of the following questions:

  • How can we reflect in an in-depth, systematic way on issues relating to language learning and ‘competence’ in ethnographic fieldwork?
  • What kinds of issues (epistemological, methodological, conceptual, theoretical) arise when researchers conduct ethnographic research in a language that is not their ‘first’ language, and what are the implications of these at different stages of the research process?
  • What ‘strategies’ have we used at different stages of our language learning? Have these led to different stages of understanding ‘in the field’ that differ from the levels commonly talked about in theories of additional language acquisition?
  • How do our experiences of learning and using additional languages in fieldwork contexts relate to our position as researchers and to wider issues of power, inequality and privilege?

Please email an abstract of no more than 300 words by 30 November 2015 to all three organisers at the addresses below.

There is no fee to participate in the workshop. Financial support is available to cover the travel and accommodation costs of a limited number of ‘early career’ participants or participants without alternative sources of funding. Further information on this and any other aspect of the workshop is available from the organisers on request.

The organisers gratefully acknowledge the support of the AHRC Translating Cultures theme and the AHRC-funded project ‘Researching Multilingually at the Borders of Language, the Body, Law and the State’ for the workshop.

Workshop Organisers:
Dr Julien Danero Iglesias (University of Glasgow): Julien.DaneroIglesias@glasgow.ac.uk
Dr Robert Gibb (University of Glasgow): Robert.Gibb@glasgow.ac.uk
Dr Annabel Tremlett (University of Portsmouth): Annabel.Tremlett@port.ac.uk

Download:

Posted in Call | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

IUG / RM Borders Online Seminar Series: Crossing Borders of Foreign Language Education & Translation in Palestine

SEMINAR 2 – Monday 30 November 2015 09.00 – 11.00 UK / 11.00 – 13.00 Gaza

Edward Said: Cultural Theory
Speaker: Dr Mohammed Nemer Abu Elmaza (London, UK)

The English Language Department at the Islamic University of Gaza (IUG) would like to invite you to attend the second online seminar of this series.
IUG is pleased to have with us our esteemed guest speaker, Dr Mohammad Abu Elmezzah, a Graduate of our English Department. Dr Abu Elmezzah will introduce you to the work of Edward Said. Comments and questions from all attendees will be welcomed.

UK / External attendees – Please email Iyad (ihasan@iugaza.edu.ps) with your Skype details no later than Sunday 29 November, so that you may be added to the online event.

Poster: 151130 Seminar 2-Edward Said – Cultural Theory

Posted in Case Study 5 - Gaza, Events | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Languages, Refugees and Migration: Research Roundtable Event

Monday, 7 December 2015 from 12.00 to 18:30
Seminar room 3 (Gannochy), Wolfson Medical School Building, University of Glasgow, G12 8QQ

About this FREE half-day participatory Knowledge Exchange event:
Numerous projects across Glasgow (and further afield) are working in Languages and their interconnection with the broad areas of Refugee and Migration Research. We hope to create a space where over the course of the event we build up wide ranging overview of the research landscape in Languages, Refugees and Migration, with the opportunity to discuss and debate the work being undertaken. We welcome anyone working or researching in these areas to come along to listen and discuss any specific issues or questions you are grappling with in your own context.

Please see our DRAFT outline of the day: 151207 Languages, Refugees, Migration – Draft SchedulePublicV2

Please note some minor changes may be made to the running order between now and the event.

Registration is essential. Please register your attendance via Eventbrite by Thursday 3 December 2015: http://december7languages.eventbrite.co.uk
You may also register via email (lauren.roberts@glasgow.ac.uk) or by calling 0141 330 8125 by 4.00pm on Thursday 3 December.
Early registration is advised due to limited spaces. Places will be allocated on a first come, first served basis.

Refreshments and a light lunch will be served 12.00 – 12.30, and an informal networking reception will take place 17.30 – 18.30.
Should you have any dietary requirements, please email lauren.roberts@glasgow.ac.uk or call 0141 330 8125 by 4.00pm on Thurs 3 December.

Accessibility: We aim to ensure that people have equal access to public events. If you need alternative formats or other reasonable adjustments, please contact Lauren Roberts on 0141 330 8125 or via email lauren.roberts@glasgow.ac.uk with your request by 4.00pm on Thurs 3 December 2015 so that arrangements, where possible, can be made.
DisabledGo Venue Guide: http://www.disabledgo.com/access-guide/university-of-glasgow/wolfson-medical-school-building-2

We regret that there is no funding available to support attendance at this event.

This event is being held in collaboration between:
GRAMNet
SSAMIS – Social Support and Migration in Scotland
Intimate Migrations
Ethical interpreting in health care settings
EU RESTORE

and is funded by AHRC Large Grant project “Researching Multilingually at the Borders of Language, the Body, Law and the State”.

We look forward to seeing you there!

Posted in Events | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Ha Orchestra Visits Denmark – November 2015

The Ha Orchestra is made up of musicians from different regions of Africa, Scotland, the UK and Europe, playing various African musical instruments including Xylophone, Kora, Sogo, Brekete, Dondo, Atumpani, Kpanlogo and Apentema drums, Kalimba, Atentenben, Ngidingi, Kamele Ngoni, Bolon, Axatse, Seprewa, Gakogui and Flutes.  Being the first African Symphonic Orchestra in Europe, this project is a melting pot of music from different regions of Africa and its Diaspora.  It taps into the vast unexplored treasure of musical cultural experiences and values brought to the UK and the rest of Europe by African.

The RM Borders project is pleased to be working with the Ha Orchestra for the duration of our project to generate and translate research into multiple creative arts forms.

A section of Ha Orchestra from Scotland will visit Denmark in November to engage in a ‘Traditional African Symphonic Orchestra Development and Networking Exchange’ with a selection of African musicians living in Denmark, and performing on the Danish music and artistic scene.  The project is designed for the musicians on both sides to engage in creative composition work and performance practice workshops.

During the two-week exchange, Ha Orchestra will engage students of Vig Music High School in performance and recording workshops.  The project is supported with funding from the Danish Arts Foundation, and the Arts and Humanities Research Council Large Grant project RM Borders.

Spearheaded by Ghanaian Artistic Director and Composer, Gameli Tordzro (Critics Award for Theatre in Scotland Award winner for music 2015) – Ha Orchestra was established in the spring of 2014.  At the invitation of the Organising Committee of Festival 2014, it made seven appearances at the Commonwealth Games in Scotland, including at the BBC The Quay in Glasgow, Merchants Square, Glasgow Green, (the main stage for music at the games) Victoria Park as part of the Queens Baton Relay Finishing Line and Kelvingrove Band Stand Amphitheatre.  Gameli is a central member of the CATC hub and PhD researcher on RM Borders.

Ha Orchestra is a part of Pan African Arts Scotland’s (PAAS), vision of a Centre of Excellence of African Arts in Scotland and in partnership with RM Borders and GRAMNet (Glasgow Refugee Asylum and Migration Network).

Watch out for Ha Orchestra performances:

  • Sunday 22 November  – 15:00
    Bartof Station, Solbjergvej 3, 2000 Frederiksberg. Just by Frederiksberg Metro Station.
  • Wednesday 25 November – 18:00
    Copenhagen Central Library (København Hovedbibliotek), Krystalgade 15, 1172 Kbh
  • Saturday 28 November – 12:00 (Children Concert)
    Copenhagen Central Library (København Hovedbibliotek), Krystalgade 15, 1172 Kbh
  • Saturday 28 November – 20:00
    Gentofte Library (Gentofte Hovedbibliotek), Ahlmans Allé 6, 2900 Hellerup
Posted in CATC, Events | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Language Research, Performance and Creative Arts

On 16th October 2015 the Centre for Language Education Research (CLER) in the School of Education at the University of Leeds hosted a day-long seminar which focused on current research which crosses over from language to arts and vice versa.  The event was co-organised with Lou Harvey, lecturer in TESOL, in conjunction with two of the AHRC’s Translating Cultures projects: Researching Multilingually at the Borders of Language, the Body, Law and the State (RM) and Translation and Translanguaging: Investigating Linguistic and Culture Transformations in Superdiverse Wards in Four UK Cities (TLANG).

Jessica Bradley, TLANG Doctoral Researcher, University of Leeds writes about this event in the TLANG Blog.

See the full post here: https://tlangblog.wordpress.com/2015/10/27/language-research-performance-and-creative-arts/

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Arts & Diversity Workshop Bucharest – 5 November

The Researching Multilingually at Borders project and the University of Glasgow in Scotland would like to invite you to an artistic workshop aimed at celebrating diversity in Bucharest.

The participation in the workshop and the dinner is free of charge.  All are welcome but just need to register as the participation is limited to 40 persons.

WHEN
Thursday, 5 November 2015 from 17:00 to 19:00

WHERE
Connect Association – Strada Ion Maiorescu 2. Sector 2. Bucharest RO

REGISTRATION
Julien.DaneroIglesias@glasgow.ac.uk
office@asociatiaconect.ro

Held by artists and researchers from different countries and origins, four workshops will be organised simultaneously:

  • In the Poetry Workshop, Tawona will lead the participants through a range of creative writing exercises with the aim of bringing out their own poetic voices.
  • In the Drama Workshop, Katja will facilitate a range of simple drama exercises as a way to celebrate and reflect on the languages and experiences that everyone carries with them.
  • In the Music Workshop, Gameli will invite participants to translate their languages and lives into sounds and rhythms.
  • In the Crafting Workshop, Cecilia will lead participants to print Ghanaian Adrinka symbols and explore how these relate to their life experiences.

At the end of the workshops, all participants are invited to taste Arabic and Sudanese specialties catered by Restaurant Gedo.

The workshops and dinner will be hosted by Connect Association: Strada Ion Maiorescu 2a+b, Sector 2, Bucharest (http://formigrants.ro/en).

Anyone in Bucharest interested in exchanging and dialoguing in an arts-based and informal manner on the diversity in Bucharest and in Romania is welcome.

Event Facebook https://www.facebook.com/events/180872835588528/

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Call for Participants!! Performance Workshop: the place of language in our lives

University of Glasgow, Room 450B Drama Lab (level 4)
Monday, 16 November 2015 from 10:00 to 16:00

In this all-day participatory theatre event, participants will ‘test’ and workshop new material written by award-winning poet Tawona Sithole to produce a short performance at the end of the day.  This material is part of an emerging play around the role that language and the creative arts play in our lives.

Tawona is developing the play for the Researching Multilingually at Borders research project at the University of Glasgow.  The material workshopped on the day will go on to inform a collaborative performance between the project team and the School of Performing Arts, University of Ghana in late summer 2016.

The performance workshop is free, informal and open to everybody.  No previous acting experience required but you must be willing to GET INVOLVED! The day is split into three parts (morning workshop, afternoon rehearsal and performance) and participants are required to attend the full day. Lunch will be provided.

To register for this exciting event please visit:

http://languageinourlives16nov.eventbrite.co.uk

We aim to ensure that people have equal access to public events. If you need alternative formats or other reasonable adjustments, please contact Lauren Roberts on 0141 330 8125 or via email Lauren.Robert@glasgow.ac.uk with your request by noon on the 11th November so that arrangements, where possible, can be made.

Please review the DisabledGo Venue Guide here: http://www.disabledgo.com/access-guide/university-of-glasgow/st-andrews-building-2

Should you have any other questions or requirements, please do not hesitate to contact Lauren Roberts (lauren.roberts@glasgow.ac.uk)

Part of the Being Human Festival of the Humanities 2015 #beinghuman15 / @BeingHumanFest

http://beinghumanfestival.org/ Being Human Logo banner

Posted in CATC, Project | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment